• AVAILABLE WORKS

Brian Singer is a San Francisco based fine artist whose projects have received international attention. His art ranges from intimate works with paper to large scale participatory projects. The 1000 Journals Project, launched in 2000, was turned into a book, a feature length documentary, and has been exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. The project was covered in The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Better Homes and Gardens and many others. Brian is also an accomplished graphic designer having created work for Apple, Adidas, SFMOMA, Chronicle Books and many others. In addition to being recognized with numerous awards and publications, he has served as the president of the San Francisco chapter of AIGA, the professional association Singer says, “In my works on paper, I'm exploring the printed word as a visual representation of information, attempting to uncover new meaning in what is slowly becoming an outdated form. Crossing out the entirety of a written text while exposing only selected words changes the perception of the original message. Revealing word frequency adds another layer and opens new paths to understanding. As an extension of this, my mixed-media pieces are created from flyers stapled to telephone poles (lost dog, garage sale, etc.). After years of weather, these community billboards become a rusting graveyard of events past. I remove the paper scraps and re-assemble them into graphic structures inlaid with chaotic bits of image, typography, and rust. I've even begun creating my own flyers, exposing them to the elements before tearing and then reassembling them into new forms. Most of the larger scale projects I create are a direct reaction to either personal or shared events. The feeling of isolation created by the internet led to The 1000 Journals Project, a shared artifact network connecting strangers the world over. The rhetoric about what's good or bad for the economy led to my questioning why we're not talking about what's good or bad for people instead. I seek to make people think, consider, and even question their preconceived beliefs.”